Melanzane in Saor is an amazing vegetarian and vegan aubergine (eggplant) dish in a sweet and slightly sour sauce, which is unique to Venice and follows a proud history of Italian food using love, respect and time to get the best of the ingredients. It's a serious make ahead dish, needing 2 days to mature but worth the wait for those fantastic flavours and perfect for buffet spreads or picnics.

Melanzane in Saor (aubergine)

Gavin Wren Recipes, Side dishes, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

Today I’m recounting an amazing Italian dish called ‘melanzane in saor’, or aubergine ‘in Saor’. It’s a very simple yet beautifully balanced Italian dish that has sweet and sour flavours that work just beautifully together. The age is the important thing, you need to make this dish well in advance to let the flavours develop, it’s perfect to make a day ahead for a buffet spread or to take along to a picnic, but don’t hurry it. If there’s one thing that Italian cooking has ever taught me, it’s that love and respect are the ingredients that make food beauteous. Visiting Venice. Just over a year ago I visited Venice, one of the most confoundingly beautiful places I’ve ever been to. I expected hustle, bustle, noise and expensive food, which was entirely correct, however I hadn’t prepared myself for the heart and soul of Venice, which is the important part.…
Labneh cheesecake with lime and coriander

Pistachio-topped labneh cheesecake with lime & coriander – no added sugar

Gavin Wren Baking, Desserts, No Added Sugar, Recipes

For once, I’m going to start talking about the food first, rather than sharing obscure excerpts from my prandial past with you. Previously on le petit oeuf, I’ve professed my love for yoghurt and featured it in a few recipes. This has developed recently into a lean towards the delights of labneh, and anyone who is following my Twitter feed (and if not, why not?) will have seen a few more labneh based adventures, such as the za’atar rolled labneh balls. If you’ve never experienced labneh, let me explain a little more about it. It’s made from plain yoghurt that has been strained, a simple process that takes it from it’s initial runny state, via the greek yoghurt-ish phase before finally reaching thick, soft-cheese-esque consistency. If you want to give it a go, I published a simple guide to how you can make great labneh at home just last week…